Steve Jobs On Death

D87C5D97-E81C-4B1B-98F9-FBFE90820178Steve Jobs (February 24, 1955 – October 5, 2011)

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

Tao Writer On Moments

B56E5F81-883D-4D7A-8545-E49C6A2562D1.jpegTao Writer (April 17, 1948 -)

If I could master just one art,
it would be the art of letting go:
of people I have known and loved,
of places I’ve traveled to and lived
of sunsets and full moons I’ve witnessed.
I would let go of this moment
as quickly as it appears, faster if I could.
I would let go of things I wished for and
especially those wishes which came true.
I’d carry nothing from this moment into the next.
For each moment would have but one life,
never preceded by a memory
never, ever, followed by a wish.

Seneca On Living

BAFA8EA6-7CC8-4BF1-A084-515D5159D148Seneca (c. 4 BC – AD 65)

You are living as if destined to live for ever; your own frailty never occurs to you; you don’t notice how much time has already passed, but squander it as though you had a full and overflowing supply – though all the while that very day which you are devoting to somebody or something may be your last. You act like mortals in all that you fear, and like immortals in all that you desire… How late it is to begin really to live just when life must end! How stupid to forget our mortality, and put off sensible plans to our fiftieth and sixtieth years, aiming to begin life from a point at which few have arrived!

Sam Harris On Happiness

50CB7793-1F2C-416D-9C7F-D769038093EBSam Harris (April 09, 1967 -)

Even in the best of circumstances, happiness is elusive. We seek pleasant sights, sounds, tastes, sensations, and moods. We satisfy our intellectual curiosity. We surround ourselves with friends and loved ones. We become connoisseurs of art, music, or food. But our pleasures are, by their very nature, fleeting. If we enjoy some great professional success, our feelings of accomplishment remain vivid and intoxicating for an hour, or perhaps a day, but then they subside. And the search goes on. The effort required to keep boredom and other unpleasantness at bay must continue, moment to moment…

Ceaseless change is an unreliable basis for lasting fulfillment… Is there a form of happiness beyond the mere repetition of pleasure and avoidance of pain?