Joan Didion On Living

   Joan Didion   (December 5, 1934 -)

Joan Didion (December 5, 1934 -)

I’m not telling you to make the world better, because I don’t think that progress is necessarily part of the package. I’m just telling you to live in it. Not just to endure it, not just to suffer it, not just to pass through it, but to live in it. To look at it. To try to get the picture. To live recklessly. To take chances. To make your own work and take pride in it. To seize the moment. And if you ask me why you should bother to do that, I could tell you that the grave’s a fine and private place, but none I think do there embrace. Nor do they sing there, or write, or argue, or see the tidal bore on the Amazon, or touch their children. And that’s what there is to do and get it while you can and good luck at it.

Genevieve Dewar on Human Nature

It’s very rare that humans like to sit still and do nothing and maintain stasis. While we love what we know and we do want to maintain it, I think all of us would love to make the world a more interesting place and a more useful place, and be able to do more things and climb higher and move faster. This is also part of our nature — the desire to create and to grow and to change.

Donald Andrew Hall On Writing

   Donald Andrew Hall   (September 20, 1928 – June 23, 2018)

Donald Andrew Hall (September 20, 1928 – June 23, 2018)

The great pleasure of being a writer is in the act of writing, and surely there is some pleasure in being published and being praised. I don’t mean to be complacent about what I have some of. But the greater pleasure is in the act. When you lose yourself in your work, and you feel at one with it, it is like love.

 

🎂Happy Birthday Donald Andrew Hall. In Memoriam🌹 

Roger Angell On Aging

  Roger Angell  (September 19, 1920 -) 

Roger Angell (September 19, 1920 -) 

I’ve endured a few knocks but missed worse. I know how lucky I am, and secretly tap wood, greet the day, and grab a sneaky pleasure from my survival at long odds. The pains and insults are bearable. My conversation may be full of holes and pauses, but I’ve learned to dispatch a private Apache scout ahead into the next sentence, the one coming up, to see if there are any vacant names or verbs in the landscape up there. If he sends back a warning, I’ll pause meaningfully, duh, until something else comes to mind.

🎂Happy Birthday Roger Angell, (September 19, 1920 -) 98 Years of Life🎂 

CS Lewis On Self Consciousness

   Clive Staples   Lewis   (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963)

Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963)

There is no reason to suppose that self-consciousness, the recognition of a creature by itself as a "self," can exist except in contrast with an "other," a something which is not the self. . . . The freedom of a creature must mean freedom to choose: and choice implies the existence of things to choose between. A creature with no environment would have no choices to make: so that freedom, like self-consciousness (if they are not, indeed, the same thing), again demands the presence to the self of something other than the self.

Maria Popova On Love

   Maria Popova   (July 28, 1984 -)

Maria Popova (July 28, 1984 -)

To love every fiber of another’s being with every fiber of your own is a rare, beautiful, and thoroughly disorienting experience — one which the term in love feels too small to hold. Its fact becomes a gravitational center of your emotional universe so powerful that the curvature of language and reality bends beyond recognition…The consummate reality of such a love is the native poetry of existence, known not in language but by heart.

Pythagoras On Philosophers

   Pythagoras   (c. 570–c. 495 BC)

Pythagoras (c. 570–c. 495 BC)

Some are influenced by the love of wealth while others are blindly led on by the mad fever for power and domination, but the finest type of man gives himself up to discovering the meaning and purpose of life itself. He seeks to uncover the secrets of nature. This is the man I call a philosopher for although no man is completely wise in all respects, he can love wisdom as the key to nature’s secrets.

Audre Lorde On Acceptable Women

   Audre Lorde   (February 18, 1934 – November 17, 1992)

Audre Lorde (February 18, 1934 – November 17, 1992)

Those of us who stand outside the circle of this society's definition of acceptable women; those of us who have been forged in the crucibles of difference – those of us who are poor, who are lesbians, who are Black, who are older – know that survival is not an academic skill. It is learning how to take our differences and make them strengths. For the master's tools will never dismantle the master's house. They may allow us temporarily to beat him at his own game, but they will never enable us to bring about genuine change. And this fact is only threatening to those women who still define the master's house as their only source of support.

Terry Tempest Williams On Aggression

    Terry Tempest Williams   (September 08, 1955 -)

 Terry Tempest Williams (September 08, 1955 -)

The irony of our existence is this: We are infinitesimal in the grand scheme of evolution, a tiny organism on Earth. And yet, personally, collectively, we are changing the planet through our voracity, the velocity of our reach, our desires, our ambitions, and our appetites. We multiply, our hunger multiplies, and our insatiable craving accelerates.

Consumption is a progressive disease.

We believe in more, more possessions, more power, more war. Anywhere, everywhere our advance of aggression continues.

 

🎂Happy Birthday Terry Tempest Williams (September 08, 1955 -)🎂

Jeanette Winterson On Language

   Jeanette Winterson   (August 27, 1959 -)

Jeanette Winterson (August 27, 1959 -)

For me, language is a freedom. As soon as you have found the words with which to express something, you are no longer incoherent, you are no longer trapped by your own emotions, by your own experiences; you can describe them, you can tell them, you can bring them out of yourself and give them to somebody else. That is an enormously liberating experience, and it worries me that more and more people are learning not to use language; they’re giving in to the banalities of the television media and shrinking their vocabulary, shrinking their own way of using this fabulous tool that human beings have refined over so many centuries into this extremely sensitive instrument. I don’t want to make it crude, I don’t want to make it into shopping-list language, I don’t want to make it into simply an exchange of information: I want to make it into the subtle, emotional, intellectual, freeing thing that it is and that it can be.