John O’Donohue On Memory

033c9-img_2344John O’Donohue (January 1, 1956–January 4, 2008)

Taking experience seriously must make it equally necessary to take the destiny or future of experience seriously. This is a particularly poignant necessity, given that the future of each experience is its disappearance. The destiny of every experience is transience…Everything, no matter how painful, beautiful or sonorous, recedes into the silence of transience. Transience too is the maker of the final silence, the silence of death.

Is the silence which transience brings a vacant silence? Does everything vanish into emptiness? Like the patterns which bird flight makes in the air, is there nothing left? Where does the flame go when the candle is blown out? Is there a place where the past can gather? I believe there is. That place is memory. That which holds out against transience is memory.

John O’Donohue On Inner Experience

   John O’Donohue   (January 1, 1956–January 4, 2008)  
John O’Donohue (January 1, 1956–January 4, 2008)  

Each one of us is privileged to be the custodian of this inner world, which is accessible only through thought, and we are also doomed, in the sense that we cannot unshackle ourselves from the world that we actually carry… All human being and human identity and human growth is about finding some kind of balance between the privilege and the doom or the inevitability of carrying this kind of world.