Elizabeth Gilbert On A Rich Life

6D322834-68CF-4C81-BBEB-5A562291D951Elizabeth Gilbert (July 18, 1969 -)

Keep your living expenses LOW. The smaller you live (materially-speaking), the bigger you can live (creatively-speaking). This way the stakes aren’t so high…you aren’t demanding of your passion that it keeps you living a rich life. Then you can stretch and grow with the most possible freedom. This was my strategy in my 20’s, and it’s the reason I worked really hard to avoid all debts, and to keep my lifestyle really manageable. If I’d been saddled with a big life, I don’t think I ever could have found my way forward to the freedom I have now. 

James Baldwin On Say Yes To Life

24997-img_0661James Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – December 1, 1987

I know we often lose, and that the death or destruction of another is infinitely more real and unbearable than one’s own. I think I know how many times one has to start again, and how often one feels that one cannot start again. And yet, on pain of death, one can never remain where one is… It is a mighty heritage, it is the human heritage, and it is all there is to trust….This is why one must say Yes to life and embrace it wherever it is found—and it is found in terrible places; nevertheless, there it is; and if the father can say, “Yes, Lord,” the child can learn that most difficult of words, Amen.

Woody Allen On Why Is Life Worth Living?

15118D0B-ECEB-44FE-A402-BEC3E937E789.jpegWoody Allen (December 01, 1935 -)

Why is life worth living? Okay, for me, I would say…well, Groucho Marx, to name one thing, and Willie Mays and the second movement of the Jupiter Symphony and Louis Armstrong’s recording of ‘Potato Head Blues’, and um, Swedish movies, naturally. Sentimental Education by Flaubert, Marlon Brando, Frank Sinatra, those incredible Apples and Pears by Cezanne. Oh, the crabs at Sam Wo’s, and um Tracy’s face.

Virginia Woolf On Life

09AFDF5A-A064-46D2-9E49-C9D22825FA1EVirginia Woolf  (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941)

How beautiful a street is in winter! It is at once revealed and obscured. Here vaguely one can trace symmetrical straight avenues of doors and windows; here under the lamps are floating islands of pale light through which pass quickly bright men and women, who, for all their poverty and shabbiness, wear a certain look of unreality, an air of triumph, as if they had given life the slip, so that life, deceived of her prey, blunders on without them. But, after all, we are only gliding smoothly on the surface. The eye is not a miner, not a diver, not a seeker after buried treasure. It floats us smoothly down a stream; resting, pausing, the brain sleeps perhaps as it looks.

Deborah Levy On Chaos And Life

   Deborah Levy   (1959) Deborah Levy (1959)

Chaos is supposed to be what we most fear but I have come to believe it might be what we most want. If we don’t believe in the future we are planning, the house we are mortgaged to, the person who sleeps by our side, it is possible that a tempest (long lurking in the clouds) might bring us closer to how we want to be in the world.

Life falls apart. We try to get a grip and hold it together. And then we realise we don’t want to hold it together.

 

August Wilson On Life

   August Wilson   (April 27, 1945 – October 2, 2005) August Wilson (April 27, 1945 – October 2, 2005)

I once wrote a short story called ‘The Best Blues Singer in the World’ and it went like this: ‘The streets that Balboa walked were his own private ocean, and Balboa was drowning.’ End of story. That says it all. Nothing else to say. I’ve been rewriting that same story over and over again. All my plays are rewriting that same story. I’m not sure what it means, other than life is hard.